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Professor Richard Calland Fellow

Professor Richard Calland, Fellow

Richard Calland has thirty years of experience in law, politics and sustainability. As a member of the London Bar he practiced law for seven years before coming to South Africa in 1994, where he is now based at the University of Cape Town (UCT) as an Associate Professor in Public Law and as a part of the academic leadership of its SDG initiative.


Biography:

In the field of sustainability strategy, Richard is a Fellow of the University of Cambridge’s Institute for Sustainability Leadership and as such has served as a member of faculty on numerous leadership programmes for organisations such as the African Development Bank, PWC, Network Rail, Namdeb, Tata, Anglo Platinum and Nedbank. In addition, he is the co-director of the African Climate Finance Hub – the only African-based organisation with a specialist track record of working with governmental and development partners on climate finance in Africa. He is a long-time retained consultant to Massmart, Africa’s largest retailer that was acquired by Walmart in 2012, advising on issues of politics and governance, as well as providing regular briefings to the investment community. He is a Founding Partner of The Paternoster Group: African Political Insight, whose past and present clients include Citadel, RCL Foods, ExxonMobile, CitiBank, Merril Lynch Bank of America and Anglo American PLC. As a specialist in Freedom of Information he currently serves as a member of the World Bank’s Independent Access to Information Appeals Board, while as an expert consultant for the Carter Center in the early 2000s he advised the governments of Mali, Jamaica, Peru, Nicaragua and Bolivia on transparency reform. A programme director at Idasa from 1995-2011, Prof Calland has founded a number of organisations including of the Council for the Advancement of the South African Constitution and the Open Democracy Advice Centre. A prominent political analyst, and a columnist for the Mail & Guardian newspaper in South Africa since 2001, his most recent book Make or Break: How the next three years will shape South Africa’s next three decades was published in 2016. Earlier books include Anatomy of South Africa: Who holds the power? and The Zuma Years.