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SABMiller Case Study: The (Sustainable) Business Case for Natural Capital Valuation
November 2013 – Working closely with the Natural Capital Leaders Platform and academics co-funded by the Valuing Nature Network, SABMiller developed its own valuation study, using a bottom-up approach.
Located in Resources / Natural Resource Security
E.Valu.A.Te Practical Guide
November 2013 – E.Valu.A.Te: The Practical Guide forms a part of this suite of resources, including an online tool. The Practical Guide provides the technical background and additional information to assist the use of the online tool.
Located in Resources / Natural Resource Security
E.Valu.A.Te Listening to Business
November 2013 – This report discusses what businesses need to close the gap between understanding/identifying externalities and mainstreaming the response to address them.
Located in Resources / Natural Resource Security
Sustainable Water Stewardship: Innovation through Collaboration
April 2013 – Since its inception in 2010, the Sustainable Water Stewardship Collaboratory has been championing a fundamental shift in the way we manage water. Convened by the University of Cambridge Institute for Sustainability Leadership (CISL) and sponsored by Anglian Water, the programme has brought together forward-thinking organisations, government and communities to explore better ways of managing and valuing water for today and the future.
Located in Resources / Natural Resource Security
The Future in Practice: The State of Sustainability Leadership
December 2012 – The State of Sustainability Leadership is the Cambridge Institute for Sustainability Leadership (CISL)’s annual collection of ideas and research into how business and policy leaders are tackling the challenges of the 21st century.
Located in Resources / Low Carbon Transformation
Professor Chris Gilligan: A ‘doubly-green’ revolution
December 2012 – According to the latest figures by the UN Food & Agricultural Organisation, 13 per cent of the world’s population is undernourished, including 33 per cent of the population of the least developed countries. Furthermore, the world faces a potential food crisis in coming decades as the population grows inexorably and as climate-related changes intensify pressures on food production. Given that the most productive land is already being used around the globe, simply increasing crop production is not the answer.
Located in Resources / Natural Resource Security
Julian Allwood: Sustainable Materials With Both Eyes Open
December 2012 – The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) estimates that global greenhouse gas reductions of 50–85 per cent will be needed by 2050 to avoid dangerous climate change, representing a radical shift away from today’s fossil-fuel-derived economy. This begs the question: is such a reduction achievable, and if so, how? This is one of the key challenges tackled through the research of Dr Julian Allwood and his Low Carbon Materials Processing Group (LCMPG) at the University of Cambridge.
Located in Resources / Natural Resource Security
Dr Bhaskar Vira: The political economy of ecosystem services
December 2012 – The past decade has seen a growing interest in ecosystem services, one of the focus areas of Dr Bhaskar Vira and his colleagues at the University of Cambridge’s Department of Geography. Ecosystems services have been defined by landmark research projects like the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment and The Economics of Ecosystems and Biodiversity (TEEB) as “the benefits people obtain from ecosystems” and “the direct and indirect contributions of ecosystems to human wellbeing”.
Located in Resources / Natural Resource Security
José Lopez: Keeping nature’s balance sheet in balance
December 2012 – Sustainable development – providing sufficient material and spiritual well-being to enable a good life for all of humankind, within the limits imposed by our one planet – is by definition a concept with global reach. This has significant implications for policymakers and the private sector alike, which influence each other.
Located in Resources / Natural Resource Security
Pavan Sukhdev: Can today’s corporations deliver tomorrow’s economy?
December 2012 – As nations entered Rio+20 to negotiate around the theme of a “green economy in the context of sustainable development and poverty eradication”, I was left confused. UNEP’s report Towards a Green Economy defined a “green economy” as one which increases well-being and social equity whilst reducing environmental risks and ecological scarcities. In other words, a green economy must reduce poverty and inequity. So why did the UN feel the need to reiterate this as a tautology in the central theme in the run-up to Rio?
Located in Resources / Natural Resource Security