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Loss of Arctic sea ice
August 2020: Melt ponds in the Arctic are causing sea ice to melt at an accelerated rate, suggesting that Arctic summers will be ice free by 2035. This may lead to sea level rises, changes in ocean currents and global weather patterns that can lead to floods, storms, costal erosion, and infrastructure destruction.
Located in Resources / Sustainability Horizons / August 2020
Measuring water scarcity
October 2019: There is a lower level of access to clean drinking water in urban areas in the global south than previously thought. Access to piped utility water is often limited due to affordability, reliability, and quality of the water provided. The paper calls for a re-focus on public utility water provision.
Located in Resources / Sustainability Horizons / October 2019
Natural Climate Solutions (NCS)
June 2019: NCS focus on ecosystem restoration projects that could deliver approximately a third of the carbon reduction needed between now and 2030. Many solutions currently receive limited funding opportunities and attract only narrow political attention.
Located in Resources / Sustainability Horizons / June 2019
New wave of nuclear business
January 2019: Rising pressure to reach climate goals incentivises governments to turn towards nuclear energy. In light of storage problems and grid congestions for renewable energies, advanced nuclear technologies are becoming promising alternatives for a decarbonised economy.
Located in Resources / Sustainability Horizons / January 2019
Ocean acidification
May 2019: Greenhouse gases reacting with seawater is leading to changes in the ocean’s surface chemistry. This can lead to habitat destruction and biodiversity loss with negative knock-on effects for coastal regions, food security and marine management practices.
Located in Resources / Sustainability Horizons / March 2019
Palliative care
June 2019: The number of people with need for palliative care will rise by almost 87% by 2060. A global integrative policy framework could help integrate palliative care into public healthcare systems to alleviate economic costs and patient suffering.
Located in Resources / Sustainability Horizons / June 2019
Policy planning in the anthropocene
February 2019: Researchers have developed a new 7 point-plan promoting cross-departmental and international collaboration to combat global challenges in the ‘Anthropocene’, such as climate change, pollution, and biodiversity loss. Earth’s systems will only be at a biophysical level favourable to human life if policy design moves from a short-term mind-set to long-term collaborative strategies.
Located in Resources / Sustainability Horizons / February 2019
Recycling plastic waste
December 2019: Developments in steam cracking and pressure technology now enable the production of ‘virgin’ quality plastics from recycled plastic waste. This could allow for plastic manufacturing sites to transition to plastic collection and refineries within the framework of their existing infrastructures.
Located in Resources / Sustainability Horizons / December 2019
Reforestation and forest protection
August 2020: Covid-19 has led to a spike in illegal forest activities resulting in increased forest degradation and deforestation, particularly in the Amazon and Congo basin. Increasing forest restoration and forest protection efforts that focus on forest intactness and biodiversity presence could support the sustainable management of forests with high ecological value.
Located in Resources / Sustainability Horizons / August 2020
Reforesting as climate change mitigation
July 2019: A recent report highlights that planting 1 trillion trees on 0.9 billion-hectare land could substantially increase carbon capture. In comparison to other mitigation strategies, reforesting programmes are the cheapest and most efficient approach.
Located in Resources / Sustainability Horizons / July 2019