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Accelerated ice loss in Greenland
February 2020: Accelerated ice loss in Greenland corresponds to the IPCC high-end climate scenario and identifies warming oceans and warmer air temperatures as primary catalysts. Melting ice will cause sea levels to rise, which, in turn, exposes more coastal communities to flooding, hurricanes, and storm surges. It strengthens calls to mitigate climate change and limit warming to the IPCC’s low-end scenario.
Located in Resources / Sustainability Horizons / February 2020
Austerity and the Green City Initiative in Oldham
February 2019: Initiatives such as the Green City Region Initiative in Greater Manchester are demonstrating that sustainable development plans can support the transformation of deprived regions. They aim to develop an integrated approach that simultaneously combats economic, social, and environmental challenges at the local level.
Located in Resources / Sustainability Horizons / February 2019
Beach erosion
April 2020: Climate change may amplify natural beach erosion which could significantly impact on sensitive wildlife habitats and coastal communities. Researchers are calling for increased adaptive capacities from coastal communities to build resilience and to increase efforts to curb climate change.
Located in Resources / Sustainability Horizons / April 2020
Blooming seaweed
July 2019: Analysis of the Great Atlantic Sargassum Belt establishes a direct relation between the blooming seaweed and higher nutrient levels in the ocean. The ocean’s chemistry changes following higher nutrient discharge from the Amazon river in response to increased deforestation and fertiliser use since 2010.
Located in Resources / Sustainability Horizons / July 2019
Carbon storage in mature forests
April 2020: Mature forests may have limited capacities to absorb extra carbon in the atmosphere due to restricting environmental growth conditions. The results could significantly impact forest carbon accounting methods and severely impact government strategies to achieve carbon neutrality targets.
Located in Resources / Sustainability Horizons / April 2020
Causal link between climate, conflict, migration
February 2019: A recent empirical assessment shows a causal connection between climate change, conflict, and migration in countries with poor governance and lower levels of democracy, such as Syria. The study underlines the complexity of migration but offers new perspectives on the potential consequences of climate change and fulfilling the UN’s SDGs.
Located in Resources / Sustainability Horizons / February 2019
Challenges of commercial sand extraction
July 2019: New evidence shows that rapid urbanisation is causing more sand to be extracted from rivers and beaches than can be replaced naturally. However, the informal industry is unregulated with only limited monitoring capacity of extraction methods or source origins.
Located in Resources / Sustainability Horizons / July 2019
Changes in distribution of marine species
April 2020: Increasing ocean temperatures may be a significant contributor to latitudinal changes in population distribution, abundance, and seasonality of marine species. Marine species migrating away from the equator towards cooler poleward waters present significant risks to food security for coastal communities and may cause knock-on effects on local marine ecosystems.
Located in Resources / Sustainability Horizons / April 2020
Climate change and human health
July 2019: A large-scale first of its kind study outlines cross-European risks and connections between climate change and public health risks, promoting an increased policy focus on health risks and challenges of accessing health care facilities at the European level.
Located in Resources / Sustainability Horizons / July 2019
Climate change and land use
September 2019: Several land mark reports are calling for profound changes in the current ways we use land and produce food. Within the next decade, agricultural and food systems will have to transition to agro-ecological systems, requiring policy and financial incentives to accelerate the changes needed to combat climate change and alleviate the public health crisis.
Located in Resources / Sustainability Horizons / September 2019