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Building design to minimise carbon emissions
March 2020: A novel technique to assemble wooden buildings uses preconfigured sub-units of cross-laminated timber to build 8-12 story high buildings. The technique only emits half the emissions compared to conventional steel and/or reinforced concrete constructions and allows for buildings to absorb carbon post construction.
Located in Resources / Sustainability Horizons / March 2020
Beach erosion
April 2020: Climate change may amplify natural beach erosion which could significantly impact on sensitive wildlife habitats and coastal communities. Researchers are calling for increased adaptive capacities from coastal communities to build resilience and to increase efforts to curb climate change.
Located in Resources / Sustainability Horizons / April 2020
UK overseas emissions
April 2020: finds that nearly half of UK’s carbon footprint in 2016 originated from ‘hidden emissions’. Hidden emissions refer to carbon released during manufacturing of goods in the country of origin. WWF calls for carbon adjustments for imported goods to ensure UK’s effective carbon neutrality by 2050.
Located in Resources / Sustainability Horizons / April 2020
Scientists declare climate emergency
December 2019: An interdisciplinary and international coalition of scientists have declared a climate emergency and are calling on decision-makers to act on climate change. The paper sets out clear interventions and identifies energy, short-lived pollutants, nature, food, economy, and population size as primary domains for intervention.
Located in Resources / Sustainability Horizons / December 2019
Risks to Africa’s flora
January 2020: More than 30% of Africa’s fauna could be at risk of extinction due to climate change, deforestation, land-use change, and population growth. The paper calls for a comprehensive assessment of global plant species to identify vulnerable species and regions and inform global bio-conservation strategies.
Located in Resources / Sustainability Horizons / January 2020
Social impact of biodiversity conservation
January 2020: Plans to place 50% of Earth’s oceans and land under protection may have significant social and economic impact on people. These impacts should be taken into consideration when formulating conservation strategies at the Convention on Biological Diversity in 2020.
Located in Resources / Sustainability Horizons / January 2020
UN report on greenhouse gases
January 2020: Concentration of warming gases has reached a record high in 2018 and will continue to rise over the next years. The findings identify an increasing gap between ambitions set out in international accords such as the Paris Agreement and reality. The authors are calling for increased levels of ambition and acceleration for decarbonising the economy and limiting warming to 1.5C.
Located in Resources / Sustainability Horizons / January 2020
Vehicle Ownership
October 2019: Exchanging existing vehicles with cleaner versions may not deliver sufficient environmental benefits. The report recommends a shift towards car ‘usership’ instead of ownership and encourages the government to improve public transport and to diversify investments into future transport technologies.
Located in Resources / Sustainability Horizons / October 2019
EU’s CAP
October 2019: Reforms of the EU’s Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) may not be efficient in improving or re-designing mechanisms to address climate change, land use, and biodiversity loss. Scientists are calling for a stronger focus on sustainability, an increased number of scientists partaking in negotiations, and a reduced influence of agri-business representatives.
Located in Resources / Sustainability Horizons / October 2019
Emotivism of nuclear energy
June 2019: New evidence shows that nuclear energy remains a highly emotive topic. Most likely, there will be 40% less use of nuclear energy than there might have been without the general public’s high sense of dread, limiting its potential to decarbonise the economy.
Located in Resources / Sustainability Horizons / June 2019