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Reforestation and forest protection
August 2020: Covid-19 has led to a spike in illegal forest activities resulting in increased forest degradation and deforestation, particularly in the Amazon and Congo basin. Increasing forest restoration and forest protection efforts that focus on forest intactness and biodiversity presence could support the sustainable management of forests with high ecological value.
Located in Resources / Sustainability Horizons / August 2020
Policy planning in the anthropocene
February 2019: Researchers have developed a new 7 point-plan promoting cross-departmental and international collaboration to combat global challenges in the ‘Anthropocene’, such as climate change, pollution, and biodiversity loss. Earth’s systems will only be at a biophysical level favourable to human life if policy design moves from a short-term mind-set to long-term collaborative strategies.
Located in Resources / Sustainability Horizons / February 2019
Causal link between climate, conflict, migration
February 2019: A recent empirical assessment shows a causal connection between climate change, conflict, and migration in countries with poor governance and lower levels of democracy, such as Syria. The study underlines the complexity of migration but offers new perspectives on the potential consequences of climate change and fulfilling the UN’s SDGs.
Located in Resources / Sustainability Horizons / February 2019
WEF global threats - Environment
February 2019: The World Economic Forum’s Global Risks Report lists five environmental threats in their list of top 10 global risks (according to their likelihood and impact). The report calls for international collaboration to combat climate change and mitigate economic and human health threats.
Located in Resources / Sustainability Horizons / February 2019
Beach erosion
April 2020: Climate change may amplify natural beach erosion which could significantly impact on sensitive wildlife habitats and coastal communities. Researchers are calling for increased adaptive capacities from coastal communities to build resilience and to increase efforts to curb climate change.
Located in Resources / Sustainability Horizons / April 2020
Resilient energy systems in the built environment
April 2020: Extreme weather events challenge the resilience of energy systems in the built environment and can lead to a higher frequency of costly partial or total blackouts. Researchers recommend increasing adaptive capacities and mitigation efforts for exiting systems and focussing on energy resilience during urban planning.
Located in Resources / Sustainability Horizons / April 2020
UK overseas emissions
April 2020: finds that nearly half of UK’s carbon footprint in 2016 originated from ‘hidden emissions’. Hidden emissions refer to carbon released during manufacturing of goods in the country of origin. WWF calls for carbon adjustments for imported goods to ensure UK’s effective carbon neutrality by 2050.
Located in Resources / Sustainability Horizons / April 2020
Socio-economic cost of deforestation
February 2020: Measuring changing carbon emission from forested lands due to commercial developments reveals the socio-economic costs of deforestation, in addition to environmental impacts.
Located in Resources / Sustainability Horizons / February 2020
Increased antibiotic stewardship needed
December 2019: An overuse of antibiotics in human health, animal health, and the agricultural sector are contributing to the rise of antimicrobial resistance and superbugs which pose risks to public health. Increased research efforts could lead to a robust evidence base that informs antibiotic stewardship programmes.
Located in Resources / Sustainability Horizons / December 2019
Scientists declare climate emergency
December 2019: An interdisciplinary and international coalition of scientists have declared a climate emergency and are calling on decision-makers to act on climate change. The paper sets out clear interventions and identifies energy, short-lived pollutants, nature, food, economy, and population size as primary domains for intervention.
Located in Resources / Sustainability Horizons / December 2019