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Just transition to decarbonised energy
August 2020: the energy sector should focus on local labour market conditions, available technology knowledge, geographic resources, and social impact in addition to its financial viability. Without integrating the social and economic dimension of energy transitions, such strategies are at risk of compounding existing inequalities.
Located in Resources / Sustainability Horizons / August 2020
Loss of Arctic sea ice
August 2020: Melt ponds in the Arctic are causing sea ice to melt at an accelerated rate, suggesting that Arctic summers will be ice free by 2035. This may lead to sea level rises, changes in ocean currents and global weather patterns that can lead to floods, storms, costal erosion, and infrastructure destruction.
Located in Resources / Sustainability Horizons / August 2020
Carbon footprints and product pricing
August 2020: Companies aiming to decrease their carbon footprint often face challenges when demand for ‘green’ products increases as rising sales often lead to increased carbon footprints of the company. Dynamic pricing based on carbon footprints combined with strategic marketing campaign may help close the carbon footprint gap.
Located in Resources / Sustainability Horizons / August 2020
Shifting India’s sugar industry from food to biofuels
August 2020: Shifting the use and production of sugar in India from food to feedstock for biofuels could decrease rising numbers of micronutrient deficiencies in India and incentivise the cultivation of more nutritious crops. It could further reduce pressure on India’s natural resources and support the decarbonisation of India’s transport sector.
Located in Resources / Sustainability Horizons / August 2020
UK overseas emissions
April 2020: finds that nearly half of UK’s carbon footprint in 2016 originated from ‘hidden emissions’. Hidden emissions refer to carbon released during manufacturing of goods in the country of origin. WWF calls for carbon adjustments for imported goods to ensure UK’s effective carbon neutrality by 2050.
Located in Resources / Sustainability Horizons / April 2020
Beach erosion
April 2020: Climate change may amplify natural beach erosion which could significantly impact on sensitive wildlife habitats and coastal communities. Researchers are calling for increased adaptive capacities from coastal communities to build resilience and to increase efforts to curb climate change.
Located in Resources / Sustainability Horizons / April 2020
Financial disclosure of meat
April 2020: Most meat companies have limited disclosure of climate-related risks and show limited progress in developing climate risk mitigation or adaptation strategies. A new analysis tool for the meat industry aims to support the financial disclosure of climate risks and opportunities for meat companies in a 2oC warming scenario.
Located in Resources / Sustainability Horizons / April 2020
Carbon storage in mature forests
April 2020: Mature forests may have limited capacities to absorb extra carbon in the atmosphere due to restricting environmental growth conditions. The results could significantly impact forest carbon accounting methods and severely impact government strategies to achieve carbon neutrality targets.
Located in Resources / Sustainability Horizons / April 2020
Changes in distribution of marine species
April 2020: Increasing ocean temperatures may be a significant contributor to latitudinal changes in population distribution, abundance, and seasonality of marine species. Marine species migrating away from the equator towards cooler poleward waters present significant risks to food security for coastal communities and may cause knock-on effects on local marine ecosystems.
Located in Resources / Sustainability Horizons / April 2020
Building design to minimise carbon emissions
March 2020: A novel technique to assemble wooden buildings uses preconfigured sub-units of cross-laminated timber to build 8-12 story high buildings. The technique only emits half the emissions compared to conventional steel and/or reinforced concrete constructions and allows for buildings to absorb carbon post construction.
Located in Resources / Sustainability Horizons / March 2020