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Disposal of PPE
August 2020: Due to the pandemic, the use and disposal of single use Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) has risen to unprecedented levels. It poses significant risks to environment and human health and could intensify pollution from plastics. New innovative methods for reusing disposed PPE will be needed in conjunction with increased waste management capacities.
Located in Resources / Sustainability Horizons / August 2020
Loss of Arctic sea ice
August 2020: Melt ponds in the Arctic are causing sea ice to melt at an accelerated rate, suggesting that Arctic summers will be ice free by 2035. This may lead to sea level rises, changes in ocean currents and global weather patterns that can lead to floods, storms, costal erosion, and infrastructure destruction.
Located in Resources / Sustainability Horizons / August 2020
Shifting India’s sugar industry from food to biofuels
August 2020: Shifting the use and production of sugar in India from food to feedstock for biofuels could decrease rising numbers of micronutrient deficiencies in India and incentivise the cultivation of more nutritious crops. It could further reduce pressure on India’s natural resources and support the decarbonisation of India’s transport sector.
Located in Resources / Sustainability Horizons / August 2020
Reforestation and forest protection
August 2020: Covid-19 has led to a spike in illegal forest activities resulting in increased forest degradation and deforestation, particularly in the Amazon and Congo basin. Increasing forest restoration and forest protection efforts that focus on forest intactness and biodiversity presence could support the sustainable management of forests with high ecological value.
Located in Resources / Sustainability Horizons / August 2020
UK overseas emissions
April 2020: finds that nearly half of UK’s carbon footprint in 2016 originated from ‘hidden emissions’. Hidden emissions refer to carbon released during manufacturing of goods in the country of origin. WWF calls for carbon adjustments for imported goods to ensure UK’s effective carbon neutrality by 2050.
Located in Resources / Sustainability Horizons / April 2020
Resilient energy systems in the built environment
April 2020: Extreme weather events challenge the resilience of energy systems in the built environment and can lead to a higher frequency of costly partial or total blackouts. Researchers recommend increasing adaptive capacities and mitigation efforts for exiting systems and focussing on energy resilience during urban planning.
Located in Resources / Sustainability Horizons / April 2020
Beach erosion
April 2020: Climate change may amplify natural beach erosion which could significantly impact on sensitive wildlife habitats and coastal communities. Researchers are calling for increased adaptive capacities from coastal communities to build resilience and to increase efforts to curb climate change.
Located in Resources / Sustainability Horizons / April 2020
Shared ecosystem services
April 2020: describes global or interregional ecosystem service flows between countries or regions. Understanding shared ecosystem services and global value flows could support the transition to more sustainable resource management practices and changed production and consumption patterns.
Located in Resources / Sustainability Horizons / April 2020
Carbon storage in mature forests
April 2020: Mature forests may have limited capacities to absorb extra carbon in the atmosphere due to restricting environmental growth conditions. The results could significantly impact forest carbon accounting methods and severely impact government strategies to achieve carbon neutrality targets.
Located in Resources / Sustainability Horizons / April 2020
Changes in distribution of marine species
April 2020: Increasing ocean temperatures may be a significant contributor to latitudinal changes in population distribution, abundance, and seasonality of marine species. Marine species migrating away from the equator towards cooler poleward waters present significant risks to food security for coastal communities and may cause knock-on effects on local marine ecosystems.
Located in Resources / Sustainability Horizons / April 2020