skip to primary navigationskip to content

Cambridge Institute for Sustainability Leadership

Studying at Cambridge

Search results

53 items matching your search terms.
Filter the results.
Item type

























New items since



Sort by relevance · date (newest first) · alphabetically
Healthy ecosystem metric framework
May 2017 – Investors and companies want to demonstrate their positive impacts on natural capital and show they are reversing the trend of natural environment degradation. The challenge is to identify metrics that are relevant for businesses’ decision-making processes, whilst being simple and practical for investors to use. This working paper outlines the concept for such metrics as developed by members of the Natural Capital Impact Group. It explores how the metric can be categorised as impacts upon the quality and quantity of soil, water and biodiversity. The paper explains the simple methodology that can be applied for business to calculate their impacts consistently and comparably, focusing particularly on the biodiversity component of this metric (soil and water components will be described in separate papers).
Located in Resources / Working Papers
Unhedgeable risk: How climate change sentiment impacts investment
November 2015 – This report analyses how shifts in market sentiment induced by awareness of future climate risks could impact global financial markets in the short term.
Located in Resources / Sustainable Finance
A climate of change: ClimateWise Principles Independent Review 2015
November 2015 – The 2015 independent annual review of the six ClimateWise Principles shows improved scores for members of the insurance industry leadership group. Progressive insurance companies are considering their exposure to climate risks while also developing their role as societies' risk managers.
Located in Resources / Sustainable Finance
Environmental risk analysis by financial institutions – a review of global practice
September 2016 – The G20’s new Green Finance Study Group asked the Cambridge Centre for Sustainable Finance to serve as Knowledge Partner and make recommendations on how to integrate environmental risk into mainstream financial decision-making.
Located in Resources / Sustainable Finance
Threading natural capital into cotton
11 February 2016 – A new Cambridge Institute for Sustainability Leadership report, produced jointly with leading global businesses, addresses natural capital challenges in the cotton industry that impact all actors, from farmer to retailers.
Located in Resources / Natural Resource Security
Climate change: Implications for superannuation funds in Australia
January 2016 – New study from our Master of Studies in Sustainability Leadership, supported by asset manager Colonial First State Global Asset Management, highlights member interest in superannuation fund climate exposure.
Located in Resources / Working Papers
The Paris Climate Agreement: Implications for banks, institutional investors, private equity and insurers
February 2016 – This briefing paper provides analysis of the most pressing points of the Paris Agreement, and other key developments from the climate summit, and concludes that a coherent, strategic response is required of financial institutions.
Located in Resources / Sustainable Finance
Nexus thinking: can it slow the Great Acceleration?
November 2014 – In July 2014, the Nexus Network commissioned 13 think pieces with the remit of scoping and defining nexus approaches, and stimulating debate across the linked domains of food, energy, water and the environment. The Cambridge Institute for Sustainability Leadership’s Jake Reynolds and Gemma Cranston have co-written a think piece entitled ‘Nexus thinking: can it slow the Great Acceleration?’ that explores how business success and corporate decision-making could be shaped by nexus thinking.
Located in Resources / Latest
Sustainability: The Leadership Challenge
November 2014 – How do you solve a problem like climate change? There is no easy answer, and while business leaders are increasingly recognising the gravity of the problem, they often find themselves powerless to make a real impact beyond their own organisations. Here Mike Peirce explores the need for wider cross-sectoral collaboration, and the role that education can play.
Located in Resources / Latest
Soil health: Evidence review
July 2017 – Many leading food and beverage sector organisations have demonstrated progress in managing natural capital impacts in their direct operations, including greenhouse gas emissions and waste. Many recognise, however, that the largest impacts occur in their upstream value chains, particularly on farms where raw materials are produced. A key natural capital resource is soil, and managing soil health is one way in which businesses may be able to reduce their negative land use impacts.
Located in Resources / Working Papers